This topic contains 10 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  gutted 3 months, 4 weeks ago.

  • Author
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  • #378

    mark1
    Participant

    It would be kind of handy with the financial planning.

    Though a touch disconcerting the day before.

    Would you want to know?

  • #379

    tom
    Participant

    Nope.

    Though I’m sure that once in a while, the wife will tell me that it’s going to happen very soon unless, etc.

  • #380

    flyguy
    Participant

    I sort of do. Not the exact date, but a pretty good idea of the timeline courtesy of cancer. Strangely, it hasn’t fazed me. In fact, I’ve found it quite liberating as I no longer have half a mind on trying to survive for as long as I can, as that option has been removed. It feels a bit less stressful. As far as financial planning goes, it would help if I had any finances to plan with!

  • #381

    andypandy
    Participant

    I’d want to know how many pages were left in a book, how long a film was or how many miles I’ve got to walk to get back to the car. Why not how many years I’ve got left?

    We all know that we’re going to die, knowing when would certainly concentrate the mind, help us focus on what is truly important and promote a sense of perspective.

    Wishing to remain in ignorance strikes me as pure squeamishness.

  • #382

    Katy
    Participant

    One of the cruelest aspects of being on Death Row I should imagine. Knowing the exact date and time of the approaching demise.

  • #383

    archer
    Participant

    Interesting. People seem to think they will live to 80, except people who are 80 who seem to think they will live 90.

    I have had a couple of Cardiac arrests, defibs the whole gig, so faced death which altered my perspective, but its easy to slip back.

  • #384

    robbie
    Participant

    I’d want to know how many pages were left in a book, how long a film was or how many miles I’ve got to walk to get back to the car. Why not how many years I’ve got left?

    We all know that we’re going to die, knowing when would certainly concentrate the mind, help us focus on what is truly important and promote a sense of perspective.

    Wishing to remain in ignorance strikes me as pure squeamishness.

    @andypandy All very well if you’re in your 40s expecting to live into your 80s. But you might die in a couple of years in a RTA. I’d rather not know that’s coming, as I don’t want to have to think constantly about my impending doom for the next 24 months, even if it does mean I can blow all my pension pot on crack and rent boys.

  • #385

    kelly
    Participant

    No I don’t want to know but we should all live our lives as if our demise may not be far away. There is nothing sadder than hearing of someone who’s had a shit life in order to save up for a great retirement only to find they croak or are laid low with some sort of disability before they get a chance to enjoy themselves.

  • #386

    bigmouth
    Participant

    I’d like a little notice. Make sure the dog is sorted out and make sure’s she’s got someone to feed her

    Then there’s making sure my will is out of its hiding place. (and the odd porn video I think is still lurking somewhere). The lawn will need cutting and I’d best make sure the washing is done – don’t want folk thinking I’m a scruffy old man.

    There’s a few family possessions i’ve been meaning to give to other family members I’m not sure my daughter will remember to hand on.

    Upstairs I’ve got a nice bottle of whiskey I’ve been keeping from my self for the last six months – I”ll need a bit of advance notice to get that down my neck. And I’ll just pop out for some Hamlet cigars – giving up took an effort but who cares now?

    Oh, cancel the papers as I won’t be paying the lass who owns our local shop. Oh, I’d better label all the ruddy keys other wise that lot will be a muddle to sort out.

    And make sure I’ve got some clean underwear on too!

  • #387

    isac
    Participant

    Knowing the day of your death sounds ok until you realise that human being are utter tossers who will use the information against you for everything from denying loans and insurance to being unutterably smug about having a few extra weeks of being an utter tosser.

    Keep ’em guessing.

  • #395

    gutted
    Participant

    Kazuo Ishiguro’s novel Never Let Me Go (or – better – the film adaptation of that novel) addresses this really will. It doesn’t deal with specific dates of death but it DOES deal with people knowing that they are not long for this world, touching on issues of destination/pre-destination, free will, motivation to get on with things etc. Highly recommended.

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