This topic contains 25 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by  mo 4 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #358

    flyguy
    Participant

    Hi guys I have slipped on some ice whilst out walking a couple days ago. Whilst I don’t think I have sprained my ankle I have done something to me heel on my right foot and I don’t know what to do. When I first did it it was super painful and inflamed. I did PRICE and it seemed to ease it somewhat, however it still very sore and I cannot properly bare weight on my foot. Should I go see a doctor or should I just keep soldiering on as I can imagine doctors are very stretched at this time of year?

  • #359

    mark1
    Participant

    NHS very stretched at moment you could be waiting a long long time to be seen in A&E. Have you a minor injuries unit it near you?

  • #360

    gala
    Participant

    Could you have plantar fasciitis maybe? possibly bought on by walking awkwardly or something you tweaked

    There is a very good Facebook support group for sufferers which still give just good general tips for sore heels, well worth a look

    If it is then really try to nip it in the bud as a full blown attack is a real misery.

  • #361

    Katy
    Participant

    If you’re non weight bearing for a few days then I’d make an appointment. Sometimes it is easier to deal with these sorts of injuries earlier to prevent the need for physio later.

    I know how you feel, I slipped in the shower in a hotel and landed with my shin on a metal shower screen rail. It wasn’t painful to walk on but the bruising was terrible and it was so painful to touch. I didn’t want to waste anyone’s time. I’m glad I went to the walk in clinic because it put my mind at rest, I had damaged the surface of the bone, nothing too serious but I needed some physio and massage to get it looking normal again.

  • #362

    flyguy
    Participant

    Thanks for your replies guys. I went to see my Doctor and he said that I have plantar fasciitis and said that I need to rest my feet but didn’t really have too much time to explain how I could prevent it from coming back when its healed.

  • #363

    isac
    Participant

    Iv had Plantar fasciitis… very sore and nasty thing.
    You could try to ease your pain:
    -Freezing a water bottle and roll it back and forward on the sole of your foot.
    -Get some Footreviver orthotic insoles
    -Stand on the end of a step with the ball of your foot and stretch your heels down you might need to wait a while to do this .
    -Best thing is to book a private sports type Physio and get them to laser it.

    Also there is a good thread about getting rid of heel and foot pain over on Utterz… https://utterz.com/forums/topic/how-to-get-rid-of-my-foot-pain-do-insoles-actually-work/

  • #364

    archer
    Participant

    Suffering from this myself, I have just got some insoles which seem to be helping, except there’s not much room for my feet in my shoes now 😮

  • #365

    sarah
    Participant

    Has this complaint always been so prevalent do we think or are we just better at recognizing and naming it these days? I’ve had it since moving house just under two years ago and it can be incredibly painful and make me wince some days, although it’s not as bad now I’ve been wearing orthotics for the past 18 months.

    Thinking back, my late Nan must have suffered similarly but she never gave it a name.

  • #366

    elly
    Participant

    Has this complaint always been so prevalent do we think or are we just better at recognizing and naming it these days? I’ve had it since moving house just under two years ago and it can be incredibly painful and make me wince some days, although it’s not as bad now I’ve been wearing orthotics for the past 18 months.

    Thinking back, my late Nan must have suffered similarly but she never gave it a name.

    Could be that the modern day lifestyle play a part and meaning plantar fasciitis more widespread in younger people? Lot more people wear High heels and even office work and sitting for long periods could alter posture affecting your feet in some way?

    I guess solving these problems and not looking for a quick pain easing is best. Leaving the root cause untreated could mean injuries could starting creeping up into your ankle…then your lower legs to your knees and lower back eeek!!

  • #367

    carly
    Participant

    I don’t know what brought mine on, I have got flat feet, something I never knew until about 10 years ago, but have been wearing flat shoes or boots every day for about the same time. If I wear heels my calves ache ! Cant think of anything Ive done differently but past 2 or 3 months have been very painful. I cant take any anti inflammatories either as Im on a blood thinner. Its quite wearing isn’t it when you cant stop walking about !

  • #368

    sarah
    Participant

    @elly You could have a point about high heels as I don’t suppose my Nan’s generation wore them nearly so often as I used to (pre plantar fascitiis) or my mother’s generation. I only knew her when she was old, obviously, and she always wore lace up leather shoes with a small heel as anything else really hurt her feet. They did give you orthotics in those days too but they were hard, clear plastic things rather than the foam insoles we can buy cheaply today.

  • #369

    sarah
    Participant

    @carly I’ve got totally flat feet too and the doctor said that would have contributed as there’s no ‘spring’ in my feet, or flippers as I should perhaps more correctly term them.

  • #370

    Katy
    Participant

    @elly I don’t think so I think for many it’s exercise that triggers it.
    In my case it was running on the beach I got up the next morning and could not take a step.
    I had a horrible time with it until I broke my leg and was basically in bed for most of the next six months and the rest cured it. I still use arch supports and do exercises and if I end buying shoes that give me a twinge I bin them at once. Both my parents suffered in their forty’s and fifties and I had to use built up shoes as a child so perhaps I was always going to suffer when older. It’s just unbelievably painful.

  • #371

    tom
    Participant

    suffered several years ago and even with special arches in my shoes now, the damage has been done. The pain went with gel heel insoles but then the tendons and ligaments collapse and so did my arches to now I am flat footed.

    Get some of these gel heel insoles to alleviate the pain I recommend FootRevivers for plantar fasciitis!

  • #372

    sarah
    Participant

    I don’t think so I think for many it’s exercise that triggers it.

    Mine started when we moved into this house and I upped my daily step count to 25/30,000 for a few days. I think that that, combined with my gosh awful flat feet made me a dead cert to suffer from it

  • #373

    jill
    Participant

    I have a heal spur, which is basically arthritis on the heal and feels just like PF. Mine hurts more in flat shoes, particularly wellies or (surprisingly) trainers. I work on a farm and do a lot of walking I blame years of wearing wellies and muckers. I also walk very heavily on my heels, which won’t have helped. I find wearing good walking boots with insoles helps, and insoles in wellies in winter. Strangely the heals I wear for work don’t affect it at all.

  • #374

    sueee
    Participant

    I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis last year. Got given exercises but nothing worked over about 3 months. Had the steroid injection just before Christmas. Can safely say that was one of the most painful things I’ve had, and very uncomfortable for a few days after but it’s almost completely gone. I have the odd twinge but I’m able to go back running and walking. If it starts to twinge, I stop and rest for a day or 2 then it goes.

    Feel your pain though!

  • #375

    kelly
    Participant

    I don’t ever really wear heels but mine is linked to my bendiness/subsequent posture issues. My right foot behaves well my left foot has a tendency to flatten shin rolls it inwards.
    I’ve not had a twinge in the last three years since I changed to ‘barefoot’ as much as possible and so pleased I did it. The rest of my body still seems to be pretty screwed whatever I try and do but at least that was one bit better!

    Given the onset of yours though OP I would imagine you may have done something more traumatic to it so if it doesn’t resolve relatively soon I would visit a physio.

  • #376

    andypandy
    Participant

    Don’t walk around the house barefoot. Get some footwear with a springy heel like cushion walk heels. You want something that has a small heel albeit a small one. You can get gel heel inserts from a site called Nuovahealth that are really cheap but effective. You can also get these arch support Strutz from the same site that you can wear around the house without having to wear shoes messing up your carpet which work well too.

    If you can go to a sports injury clinic they might be able to fit you with some orthodontics (is that teeth or feet??). Walking without supportive footwear, i.e. these ballerina type shoes with no heel at all is what causes the problem in the first place as well as being overweight (if you are) as you are placing more strain on your heels. Also having low arches causes it.

  • #377

    mark1
    Participant

    One big contributor to plantar fasciitis is the little structureless ballet pumps and overly squishy ‘trainers’ we are all prone to wearing. Plantar Fasciitis is a symptom of over use/over stretching and when our feet get no support everything overworks and overstretches. That is not to say we need rock solid but some structure is really important. One of the reasons that heel cups relieve symptoms is that they shorten the structures in the feet so relieve the over use a bit.

    Bear in mind that we are all different too and some peoples feet are better with less structure – a good podiatrist will get you right

  • #388

    jim
    Participant

    I have plantar fasciitis at the moment. I do think that is a big generalisation as there are plenty of people like me who do much better barefoot as it was the wearing of cushioned shoes with a small heel that messed them up in the first place. All of my shoes are now zero drop (heel to toe) and minimal cushioning other than my work boots.

  • #389

    cammy
    Participant

    @jim When I went to the sports injury clinic it was at the time that all these folding ballerina shoes that you could stick in your handbag, were coming into fashion and the chap who was a specialist said he would expect to see many girls coming in due to this footwear causing PF. He also said it was the lack of heel and walking barefoot on hard surfaces like lino and short carpet that contributed significantly to the heel pain which is what a lot of the websites also agree with. Also excessive pronation (feet rolling inwards) which mine do. I wore some very ‘old lady’ type sandals that my mum wore (probably another generalization there lol) and they had a cushioned heel and made a huge difference.

    It took about 14 months for mine to go away completely.

  • #390

    bigmouth
    Participant

    Somewhere in the recesses of my mind, I seem to remember plantar fasciitis being called “policeman’s heel” from the old days when bobby’s did a lot of beat walking so it’s definitely not a new invention.

    Mine improved after throwing away one particular pair of wellies and losing a bit of weight.

  • #392

    gutted
    Participant

    You need to wear proper supportive insoles. I had plantar fascitiis and wearing insoles in my everyday shoes really helped. The best insoles for plantar fasciitis in my opinion are Footrevivers they will give your feet just the right amount of support and wont make your shoes feel bulky or tight. I have tried other brands such as scholl and superfeet and they did not even compare.

  • #394

    jim
    Participant

    @cammy I wonder if that comment came from the fact that people were wearing such shoes for a long night out without ‘training up to them’. So they were wearing them with very weak feet and then causing themselves injuries.

    Essentially I have solved the problem by strengthening my feet and getting them to work properly, not having a breakover forced by hard soles but bending and flexing as they should. Other people will solve the problem by protecting their feet by supporting them. I did try the latter first but it didn’t make any difference to me hence trying the former

  • #425

    mo
    Participant

    I have been wearing over the counter insoles for a week that I bought from amazon, they are helping with the pain but changing my balance and knee is now hurting a lot so I am thinking I might need to buy some better ones! Also I have a soreness in my heel that feels as if its been burnt on a hot plate, is this usual with PF?

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