kevinj

active 4 months, 2 weeks ago

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    • #5410

      kevinj
      Participant

      It was poor judgment and/or arrogance to imagine that people would want to vote for him.

      Why would you not field a new candidate?

    • #1007

      kevinj
      Participant

      I work for a lubricant manufacturer in a sales/technical role and have done for 22yrs. I’ll offer my 2p worth from the oil side.

      My database suggests you need a 5w30 or 5w40 oil meeting the VW specifications you mention. To simplify things you are most likely to find a 5w30. Don’t worry too much about that difference. The 5w30 part refers to the oils viscosity characteristics (it is an SAE 5 oil when cold (Winter – hence the w) and has polymers that make it behave like an SAE 30 when hot) and is not indicative of quality. The small numbers and letters refer to the quality and performance of the oil. There should be a generic API rating for petrol engines, currently at around SL/SM/SN And then brand specific ratings such as the VW 504.00 / 502.00. These indicate the quality and suitability of the oil.

      Don’t worry too much about semi/fully synthetic, if it meets the VW spec it will be fine. I always refer to car oil semi/synthetics as Semi-semantics, its word play, it (well, a few exceptions, mostly found in motorsport oils) all comes from crude oil and refers to how refined it is, and what catagory of base stock is used to make the oil. No need for any more on that here…

      Don’t get too hung up on the service interval/long life element of the specs especially if you are running ~10k miles per year. Both will be fine. I’m not too familiar with those specs but I’d expect that the difference is primarily in the additive package with a higher level of detergent/dispersant to clean the oil and possibly a higher level of high catagory base stock to resist degradation. Both oils will lap up sub 10k annual mileage with annual changes.

      Oils will readily mix. The only oils that don’t mix are Poly Glycol Synthetics, and they typically go no where near a car engine. Some people have a vested interest in perpetuating myths about oils.

      Petrol engines are more forgiving of poor oil selection than Diesel engines. DPFs are notorious for sensitivity to the wrong oil.

      The point about petrol stations bring overpriced is a good one. Go to a trade motor factor, get an oil filter as well, and if you really want to protect your oil, a new air filter. This is often overlooked. I’d echo those warning against overfilling too.

    • #936

      kevinj
      Participant

      He’s a dick. End of.

    • #867

      kevinj
      Participant

      Secure/immutable voting is one possible application of blockchain technology. I believe the Brazilian govt were looking at running their vote on the Ethereum network to cut down on fraud. One token per voter.

    • #500

      kevinj
      Participant

      I once was seconded to work for an international tobacco company whom had basically modelled the future market and concluded that the market for traditional tobacco in the western world would be dead in 5-10yrs and e-cigs would follow shortly once people got wind of the issues with them.

      These people had more money than entire nations, the power to lobby governments and officials with the greatest of ease, and their attitude and mindset made bond villains look like part timers. I concluded that their lack of investment in e-cig’s was based on sound science and market predictions.

      Ultimately they picked a third way which was to invent a cigarette system which had no ‘biomarkers of harm or risk’ (cancer causing stuff), but had the same taste, smell, smoke and ‘ritual’ (the sales hook). When I left the programme they had successfully completed human clinical trials across Europe, US and Japan so I would imagine this device is now almost ready for market.

    • #479

      kevinj
      Participant

      I have to admit, some of the younger members of staff at work really do make me wonder on occasion about the resilience of a certain age group. My personal experience (and it is only that), is that there seems to be an attitude of entitlement without effort. it is definitely a little divisive in the workplace with older members of staff on occasion appearing to resent the lack of desire to make the effort to progress or undertake any work other than the minimum to get through the day which is exhibited by some of the younger staff.

      As I write this it feels like a sweeping generalisation, and I caveat this with the comment that it is not everyone from this age group.

      I do have to deal with a few special little snowflakes, but there are those who just get on with the job and perform really well.

      So, I do wonder if it as much about the upbringing of the individual as opposed to the ‘social media generation’ as a whole.

      Nature or nurture??

    • #1051

      kevinj
      Participant

      Possibly a grain of truth in that for (older) petrol engines, but pay attention to the required ACEA spec, this is the European oil spec. (API is American, JASO is Japanese). That used to be A for petrol, B for passenger diesel, E for commercial diesel, and oils would be rated ACEA A2 B2 etc. The A/B ratings have now been largely superseded by a C rating for Catalytic converter compatibility. This in part refers to levels of the anti wear additive Zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) in the oil, it used to be present in high levels but the phosphorous damages Cat converters and levels have been progressively reduced. The levels of Sulphated Ash, Phosphorous and Sulphur (SAPS) in oil is critical to most modern engines which will require an ACEA C1 C2 C3 or C4 oil, each of which is particular about levels of SAPS, and ensure the base stock and the additive package is suitable for the emissions control and fuel economy requirements of that particular engine.

      As I said above I have a bit of an issue with the terms ‘Semi-Synthetic’ and ‘Synthetic’. To clarify, that is not because there is no difference in them, but because I feel the terms are often used misleadingly. The vast majority of oils marketed as Synthetic are crude oil in origin. This is not a problem but most people are surprised by this, and the technical definition of this type of synthetic (fully hydrocracked crude oil) is at odds with most peoples intuitive definition – never been in the ground… Now I’m not an expert on engine oils, I’m more into cutting oils, but to my knowledge Semi-Synthetic, Synthetic Fortified, Synthetic Blend, Part synthetic are all marketing terms which mean next to nothing. Oils marketed as such could contain very different amounts of base stocks in very different proportions. Take two hypothetical base formulations, ie before the additive is blended in;

      Oil A, base stock; 70% group 1, 30% group 3. Costs say, 65p per litre to make

      Oil B, base stock; 85% group 3, 15% group 1. Costs say, 92.5p per litre to make

      Both could carry identical labels claiming they are both ‘Semi-Synthetic’ or ‘Synthetic blend’ or ‘Part Synthetic’ but the difference in quality will be significant, and the public would never know.

    • #1012

      kevinj
      Participant

      Again, I was thinking mainly of Engine oils, and that a Comma 5w30 will mix happily with Quantum 5w30 and a dash of Halfords 5w30 won’t do any harm. I should have made that clear, that part of my post was sloppily worded and should be disregarded. If all oils mixed freely and did a good job of it, well, we would sell one product and I’d be out of a job.

      Machine lubrication is another pot of fish. Gear boxes in particular. It sounds possible that your mistake was mixing 2 incompatible gear oils, if it needed mineral gear oils or PAO synthetic gear oils (which are miscible), and you used a PG synthetic type (or vice versa) it won’t mix and would cause severe problems. Other things to be mindful of are oils containing Zinc if silver is present, and oils containing Sulphur/Phosphorous if yellow or white metal is present. Compressors are another minefield for the unwary, as is selecting greases.

      I’d always recommend checking with the manual before filling, and asking your supplier!

    • #1011

      kevinj
      Participant

      I’m referring to engine oils here, the base stock is classed in 5 groups, the first 3 of which are derived from crude oil. Group 1 is ‘mineral’ oil, Groups 2 & 3 are mineral oils further hydrocracked to remove impurities. There is no real description of what “semi-synthetic” actually means, and can in reality be any blend of base stocks, though “fully-synthetic” would mean 100% group 3 base stock.

      So, any seal compatibility with these should be similar as they are essentially the same oil, just cleaner, typically with less sulphur content. ‘Synthetic’ oils tend to be thinner than mineral oils (SAE 0w, 5w, 10w as opposed to SAE 15w, 20w etc) and might find faults in seals that thicker mineral oils don’t). What really does start to confuse things are when groups 4 and 5 start to be included. These are things like PAO synthetics and Esters. These are expensive and are not common in most passenger car oils, but they do find their way into Motorsport and very high performance oils. I’m not really able to offer much information on these without going very far from my comfort zone!

    • #984

      kevinj
      Participant

      I’m not sure he is being lavishly entertained or kowtowed to. The whole thing seems more like ‘OK, it’s the President of the US so we have to keep up diplomatic relations, let’s just get this clown in and away as fast as possible,’

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