mark1

active 3 months, 3 weeks ago

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    • #5412

      mark1
      Participant

      To my mind, it can more read like him trying to make life simpler by ‘fudging’ things, because he didn’t stand to make any money from it. I can’t see why he didn’t claim it from the Office Costs Budget, that seems a bit strange to me, I guess it would have used up all funding available for him towards sorting out his offices in the simplest of ways if what he’d tried had worked out.

      ”The court heard Davies had contacted a photographer in Brecon and purchased nine images from him to decorate and display in his constituency office – using his own money to pay the £700 for them initially.

      There were two budgets available to him, the Start Up Costs Budget – for office furniture and IT equipment – and The Office Costs Budget, both of which he could claim the full amount from.

      But Philip Stott, prosecuting, revealed Davies found in February 2016 that only £476.02 was left in the Start Up Costs Budget, with £8,303.75 remaining in the other.

      He then proceeded to create two fake invoices, so the £700 cost could be split between the two budgets – £450 to the Start Up and £250 for the other.”

      I get pretty annoyed at politicians taking the mickey, but I can’t say it bothers me if simplifying life is what he was trying to do. It doesn’t appear that he was doing something as taking the mickey as claiming for a duck house, or trying to pocket the money. The spirit of what the money is provided for was followed, even if he didn’t quite follow the rules, I think.

    • #1010

      mark1
      Participant

      One top tip is to get a funnel as trying to pour the oil into the little filling hole when you take the dipstick out is frustrating and messy in equal measure!

    • #830

      mark1
      Participant

      There are 10 times more bacterial cells in our bodies than human ones, I’m guessing they’re rather important! Although I have no idea how they benefit us, maybe someone on here knows…

    • #469

      mark1
      Participant

      If ecigs are just as bad should they have the same level of restrictions on them as normal cigs?

      Yes, but I don’t think that anybody has suggested that they are. If you worry about cancer, then I would be far more concerned with traffic pollution or UV exposure in day to day life than passive e-cig smoking.

    • #458

      mark1
      Participant

      it was my understanding ‘hunters’ typically killed animals that would otherwise be killed by the rangers themselves. If there are two elephant bulls vying for the same cows. Or there is an old bull who is no longer effectively mating and holding up the birth rate of the herd. Etc etc.

      @cammy That’s what I had been led to believe, yet in that footage it was a healthy young bull elephant he shot, so the Ranger with him screwed up in choosing the “wrong” sort of elephant (he admitted that afterwards), and by not immediately killing the injured elephant when his client failed to kill it with his first shot.

      When the American “clients” were laughing a playing around with trying to shoot crocs in the pond at Mabula, I found their behaviour infantile and sickening. I’ve been to Mabula on game watching safaris, where the only shooting I did was with camera. It’s a beautiful private game reserve, and I had no idea that they were now geared up for trophy hunters. If that’s how trophy hunters behave, I shall not go there again.

      You are right that old animals have to be culled, particularly elephants, because although they grow several sets of teeth in their lifetime, eventually all of them will grind down their teeth due to their getting soil and grit into the grass they eat. It’s a natural process but in the wild old elephants die a long lingering death through starvation, so culling old elephants is the kindest option. The same goes for old big cats who can no longer hunt, and eventually starve. As you say, this culling is normally done by highly trained Rangers, but the trend now is to sell the right to kill them to trophy hunters who will pay huge sums to do this. The argument is, if they are going to be culled anyway why not sell the right to trophy hunters which generates big income? The money so generated is meant to be ploughed back into conservation and to pay for anti poaching patrols where the poachers can earn big money themselves from illegal trade in ivory and rhino horns.

      As the film showed the carnage done by poachers is much worse than that done by trophy hunters.

      It’s easy to get moralistic, but as the documentary showed, the answers aren’t as simple and straightforward as it appears at first sight.

    • #440

      mark1
      Participant

      @jimmy In a sense I agree but I have no doubt my parents (wartime) generation were more stoic and, yes, generally tougher. But that was a product of the times and we are more fortunate.

    • #419

      mark1
      Participant

      @carly Yeah, it may be possible to get an edge on a particular wheel or with a particular croupier – but, in addition to the enormous amount of work required to do this, you have to remember that the casino will be looking out for this and will work against you. They can (and do) rotate croupiers to make this harder, and can simply refuse to take your bets if they want.

      You’d have to be enormously skilled at subterfuge to beat a casino at their own game!

    • #399

      mark1
      Participant

      Don’t do it – it’s extremely dangerous.

      You can quickly get to a situation where you’re wagering vast sums of money to try to win a very small amount; ultimately you run the risk of reaching a point where you simply can’t afford to place the bet, or, more likely, you’ll reach the max stake for the table and be unable to win your money back. And yes, the casino may decide they don’t like what you’re doing and refuse to take further wagers.

      Of course, probability being what it is, you’ll usually get away with this – you have a high chance of winning a small amount, and a small chance of losing a huge amount.

      It isn’t a winning strategy in the long term, though – whatever you do in European Roulette you will tend towards losing an average of 1/37th of the total amount you wager, the house edge is built in. (1/74th for French Roulette, 1/19th for American Roulette with the 0 and 00).

    • #377

      mark1
      Participant

      One big contributor to plantar fasciitis is the little structureless ballet pumps and overly squishy ‘trainers’ we are all prone to wearing. Plantar Fasciitis is a symptom of over use/over stretching and when our feet get no support everything overworks and overstretches. That is not to say we need rock solid but some structure is really important. One of the reasons that heel cups relieve symptoms is that they shorten the structures in the feet so relieve the over use a bit.

      Bear in mind that we are all different too and some peoples feet are better with less structure – a good podiatrist will get you right

    • #359

      mark1
      Participant

      NHS very stretched at moment you could be waiting a long long time to be seen in A&E. Have you a minor injuries unit it near you?

    • #342

      mark1
      Participant

      @andypandy What do you think ‘the limit’ has been calculated as being? I work in Wigan supporting asylum seekers (quick google should throw up what I do etc). In Greater Manchester, the figure is 1 per 200. We don’t quite reach that figure in Wigan (not enough cheap housing stock) but we have a very well cohessed community. This does place demands on services, but we manage, helped massively by community/voluntary organisations. I believe the UK can take many more (the issue being the uneven dispersal across the UK to areas of cheap housing whose local authorities are possible already amongst the most stretched).

      Your point about violent intervention is utter claptrap. Not only does it rarely work, but most asylum seekers in the UK are not coming from typical war zones. These people usually flood into neighbouring countries in their millions (Jordan, Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon, Iran).

    • #339

      mark1
      Participant

      I feel your pain I get migraines, with visual aura. Food is my major trigger, mainly sugar and carbs so porridge with sugar would be a no-no for me, as would not eating breakfast. Also driving at night can bring it on.

      My medical MiL suggested when you first feel one coming on to take your preferred painkiller and a strong dose of caffeine immediately. This works most of the time for me, whether through actually reducing blood pressure in head or by me being more aware I couldn’t say though.

    • #261

      mark1
      Participant

      Are there any basic principles about cooking curries with tomatoes, slow-cooked meat and yoghurt that I should go with?

      Generally – not always, but usually – don’t use yoghurt if you’re using tomatoes, they tend not to play well together.

      But for a weekday, slow-cooked curry don’t bother with spices and similar malarkey. Get a jar of whichever Pataks paste appeals (the paste, not the runnier sauce), follow the instructions on the back until you get to the ‘simmer’ stage, bung it in the slow cooker and later on, Bob’s your bream.

      If you want an alternative that doesn’t involve the slow cooker but still doesn’t have you following the whole recipe from scratch yourself, pick up one of the Spice Tailor packets. The instructions are simple, the spices you need are there and they don’t take too long to knock together; good stuff for a midweek evening.

      I say all this as a curry fan who likes the whole process of doing it himself from scratch; but things like Pataks pastes and Spice Tailor packets exist for a reason and I’m happy to use either when it’s appropriate.

    • #241

      mark1
      Participant

      We’ve not had and real howlers, and the best one wasn’t even a substitution, just my sister having a blond moment! When she was about 15 my mum trusted her to do the online shopping, we did it quite regularly so already had a ‘regulars’ trolley. Wanted banana’s, 14 to be precise – what turned up was nearly 100 banana’s, she’d ordered 14 PACKETS of banana’s this would have been ok, but she made the same mistake with the cheese and onion pasties; we ended up with 6 packets of 4 pasties, rather than 6 individual pasties 😀 Whoever did the picking for that shop must have thought we had a Banana and Pastie problem, still makes me laugh thinking about it. We all thought it was hilarious, and my sister was never allowed to do the online shop again, even at 21 we still tease her about it.

    • #236

      mark1
      Participant

      In the case I read about there were messages from the accuser which pointed to the innocence of the accused which the police knew about but did not disclose. They have both a duty in law to investigate all reasonable lines of enquiry and to disclose information which may assist the defence.

      Evidence doesnt only point to guilt; it can also point to innocence.

    • #235

      mark1
      Participant

      It’s a failure to disclose evidence, of which the police were aware, which points away from the guilt of the suspect. That’s not to say the system isn’t under-resourced and creaking, but when you have that information and don’t disclose it, it points more to negligence to me.

    • #212

      mark1
      Participant

      It’s something I’ve suffered from pretty much my whole life, I’m on several medications and have had various therapies etc. They knew about this when I was interviewed, I was very open and honest about it all. I went back to GP last night and she was lovely, she’s increased my medication and advised I take some time off to sort myself out. My manager gave me an ultimatum yesterday and said “we need t know by tomorrow if you are staying or handing your notice in”. I have told my manager that i am signing off for a week as i cant make a decision like thst when i feel so anxious. I dont know if my anxiety is making the job a challenge or if the job tself is challenging me and causing anxiety. If thst makes sense? t It didn’t go down well, been told I’m costing them money and it’s not fair. I really don’t know, I appreciate I havent given them a decision but I feel like if I do right now then it would he to leave as my anxiety is telling me to get away and escape it all but if I can sort it out in my head and process it then maybe actually the working alone etc won’t bother me.

    • #167

      mark1
      Participant

      From the first case, it seems evidence of innocence wasn’t updated on the file. Looks like mistakes were made because people were too busy.

      @sam that isn’t really the issue; it is just as possible that the evidence never existed in the first place (presumably there are many cases where it doesn’t). Evidence, sufficient to secure a conviction, should not exist in a case where no crime occurred, and no defence against an accusation of rape should require the defence to offer evidence that the accused is innocent.

      I would expect under-resourcing in the CPS to result in a reduction in the conviction rate; there is no way in which it should result in wrongful convictions without there being a wider problem.

    • #165

      mark1
      Participant

      This is totally a resources issue.

      It can’t be entirely that. In each of these cases, the CPS felt that they had enough evidence for there to be a reasonable chance of a prosecution, meaning that they felt the accused would be more likely than not convicted based on what they would present. In one case was there actually was a conviction.

      In other words, evidence that would probably be sufficient to secure a conviction existed in cases where it now seems almost certain that no crime occurred. That suggests to me that there is an issue besides under-resourcing.

    • #1014

      mark1
      Participant

      Absolutely fine, it’ll keep in the shed for ages. perhaps get a plastic bottle and leave full of new oil in the spare wheel well, it could get you or a mate out of a pickle should the oil light ever come on

    • #800

      mark1
      Participant

      I suspect you are equally unaware of what the Syrian army is doing in Yarmouk. A suburb of Damascus, once home to 115,000 descendants of Palestinian refugees, now largely depopulated and destroyed.

      https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/04/estimated-60-percent-yarmouk-destroyed-violence-group-180427102610652.html

      Quoting from this. Action Group for Palestinians of Syria says at least 3,729 Palestinian refugees have been killed during Syria’s civil war, while 309 are considered missing and another 1,674 are currently detained.

      The major killers of Palestinians it seems are other Arabs.

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